Martin Tingley with Wenjing Zheng, Simon Ejdemyr, Stephanie Lane, and Colin McFarland

This is the second post in a multi-part series on how Netflix uses A/B tests to inform decisions and continuously innovate on our products. See here for Part 1: Decision Making at Netflix. Subsequent posts will go into more details on the statistics of A/B tests, experimentation across Netflix, how Netflix has invested in infrastructure to support and scale experimentation, and the importance of the culture of experimentation within Netflix.

An A/B test is a simple controlled experiment. Let’s say — this is a hypothetical! — we want…


By Ricky Gardiner, Alex Borysov

Background

In our previous post, we discussed how we utilize FieldMask as a solution when designing our APIs so that consumers can request the data they need when fetched via gRPC. In this blog post we will continue to cover how Netflix Studio Engineering uses FieldMask for mutation operations such as update and remove.

Example: Netflix Studio Production

Money Heist (La casa de papel) / Netflix

Previously we outlined what a Production is and how the Production Service makes gRPC calls to other microservices such as the Schedule Service and Script Service to retrieve schedules and scripts (aka screenplay) for a particular production such as La Casa De…


Written by Jose Fernandez, Arthur Gonigberg, Julia Knecht, and Patrick Thomas

Netflix Zuul Open Source Logo

In 2017, Netflix Studios was hitting an inflection point from a period of merely rapid growth to the sort of explosive growth that throws “how do we scale?” into every conversation. The vision was to create a “Studio in the Cloud”, with applications supporting every part of the business from pitch to play. The security team was working diligently to support this effort, faced with two apparently contradictory priorities:

  • 1) streamline any security processes so that we could get applications built and deployed to the public internet faster
  • 2)…


Martin Tingley with Wenjing Zheng, Simon Ejdemyr, Stephanie Lane, and Colin McFarland

This introduction is the first in a multi-part series on how Netflix uses A/B tests to make decisions that continuously improve our products, so we can deliver more joy and satisfaction to our members. Subsequent posts will cover the basic statistical concepts underpinning A/B tests, the role of experimentation across Netflix, how Netflix has invested in infrastructure to support and scale experimentation, and the importance of the culture of experimentation within Netflix.

Netflix was created with the idea of putting consumer choice and control at the center of…


By Alex Borysov, Ricky Gardiner

Background

At Netflix, we heavily use gRPC for the purpose of backend to backend communication. When we process a request it is often beneficial to know which fields the caller is interested in and which ones they ignore. Some response fields can be expensive to compute, some fields can require remote calls to other services. Remote calls are never free; they impose extra latency, increase probability of an error, and consume network bandwidth. How can we understand which fields the caller doesn’t need to be supplied in the response, so we can avoid making unnecessary computations…


By: Nadeem Ahmad, Ramya Somaskandan

Introduction

The Netflix TV app is used across millions of smart TVs, streaming media players, gaming consoles, and set-top boxes worldwide. As the team that focuses on developer productivity for the org, our role is to enable the engineers that develop, innovate on, and test this app to be more productive.

In practice, one of the ways we do this is by providing data as to whether a code change is safe to merge to the main branch or not. There are a few reasons that it is crucial for us to get this right. First…


By Benson Ma, Alok Ahuja

Introduction

At Netflix, hundreds of different device types, from streaming sticks to smart TVs, are tested every day through automation to ensure that new software releases continue to deliver the quality of the Netflix experience that our customers enjoy. In addition, Netflix continuously works with its partners (such as Roku, Samsung, LG, Amazon) to port the Netflix SDK to their new and upcoming devices (TVs, smart boxes, etc), to ensure the quality bar is reached before allowing the Netflix application on the device to go out into the world. …


By Andrew Nguonly, Armando Magalhães, Obi-Ike Nwoke, Shervin Afshar, Sreyashi Das, Tongliang Liu, Wei Liu, Yucheng Zeng

Background

Over the next few years, most content on Netflix will come from Netflix’s own Studio. From the moment a Netflix film or series is pitched and long before it becomes available on Netflix, it goes through many phases. This happens at an unprecedented scale and introduces many interesting challenges; one of the challenges is how to provide visibility of Studio data across multiple phases and systems to facilitate operational excellence and empower decision making. …


This post is part of our “Data Engineers of Netflix” series, where our very own data engineers talk about their journeys to Data Engineering @ Netflix.

Kevin Wylie is a Data Engineer on the Content Data Science and Engineering team. In this post, Kevin talks about his extensive experience in content analytics at Netflix since joining more than 10 years ago.

Kevin grew up in the Washington, DC area, and received his undergraduate degree in Mathematics from Virginia Tech. Before joining Netflix, he worked at MySpace, helping implement page categorization, pathing analysis, sessionization, and more. …


By Burak Bacioglu, Meenakshi Jindal

Asset Management at Netflix

At Netflix, all of our digital media assets (images, videos, text, etc.) are stored in secure storage layers. We built an asset management platform (AMP), codenamed Amsterdam, in order to easily organize and manage the metadata, schema, relations and permissions of these assets. It is also responsible for asset discovery, validation, sharing, and for triggering workflows.

Amsterdam service utilizes various solutions such as Cassandra, Kafka, Zookeeper, EvCache etc. In this blog, we will be focusing on how we utilize Elasticsearch for indexing and search the assets.

Amsterdam is built on top of three storage layers.

Netflix Technology Blog

Learn more about how Netflix designs, builds, and operates our systems and engineering organizations

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